What every country in the EU pays to be a member and what they get back.

Since 2016 the year the UK decided to leave the EU changes on how much every country pays came into effect.

Below is an up to date account as to how much everyone pays

Austria is a federal parliamentary republic with a head of government — the chancellor — and a head of state — the president. The country consists of 9 states (Bundesländer). Both regional and federal governments exercise executive power. The federal Parliament consists of 2 chambers: the Lower House (Nationalrat) — directly elected — and the Upper House (Bundesrat) — elected by regional parliaments.

Hallstatt Austria

They pay in contribution to the EU budget € 2.429 billion a year

They are then paid back € 1.743 billion.

Belgium is a federal constitutional monarchy in which the king is the head of state and the prime minister is the head of government in a multi-party system. Decision-making powers are not centralized but divided between 3 levels of government: the federal government, 3 language-based communities (Flemish, French, and German-speaking) and 3 regions (Flanders, Brussels Capital, and Wallonia). Legally they all are equal but have powers and responsibilities for different fields. Brussels is, together with Luxembourg City and Strasbourg, one of the three official seats of the European institutions.

Grand-Place of Brussels

Total Belgian contribution to the EU budget: € 2.978 billion

Total EU spending in Belgium: € 7.358 billion

Bulgaria is a parliamentary republic. The head of government — the prime minister — holds the most powerful executive position. The head of state — the president — primarily holds representative powers as well as limited veto powers. Bulgaria is a unitary state with a centralized structure. It consists of 27 provinces and a metropolitan capital province (Sofia-Grad). The regional governors are appointed by the government.

Sofia, Bulgaria

Total Bulgarian contribution to the EU budget: € 0.379 billion

Total EU spending in Bulgaria: € 1.896 billion

Croatia is a parliamentary republic in which the head of government — the prime minister — and the head of state — the president — represent the executive power and the state at home and abroad. The government structure is based on the separation of legislative, executive and judicial powers. The Parliament holds legislative power and also controls the executive. Its members are elected for 4 years.

Croatia

Total Croatian contribution to the EU budget: € 0.359 billion

Total EU spending in Croatia: € 0.663 billion

Cyprus is a presidential republic. The president is both head of state and government. Despite joining the EU as a de facto divided island, the whole of Cyprus is EU territory. Turkish Cypriots who have, or are eligible for, EU travel documents are EU citizens. EU law is suspended in areas where the Cypriot government (Government of the Republic) does not exercise effective control. Cyprus has two official languages: Greek and Turkish.

Cyprus

Total Cypriot contribution to the EU budget: € 0.137 billion

Total EU spending in Cyprus: € 0.207 billion

Czechia is a parliamentary republic with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the president. The country was formed in 1993, after Czechoslovakia was split into Czechia and Slovakia. The country is now divided into 14 regions, including the capital, Prague.

Czechia

Total Czech contribution to the EU budget: € 1.282 billion

Total EU spending in Czechia: € 3.895 billion

Denmark is a constitutional monarchy. It has a representative parliamentary system with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the monarch — who officially retains executive power, although duties are strictly representative and ceremonial. The kingdom also comprises 2 autonomous constituent countries in the Atlantic, neither of which are EU members: the Faroe Islands and Greenland.

Denmark

Total Danish contribution to the EU budget: € 1.927 billion

Total EU spending in Denmark: € 1.459 billion

Estonia is a parliamentary republic. Its head of government — the prime minister — is nominated by the president and approved by parliament. He or she is in charge of the executive power vested in the government. The head of state — the president — is elected by Parliament or electoral college for 5 years. The Parliament has 101 members, elected every 4 years. The country is divided into 15 counties and 79 municipalities.

Estonia

Total Estonian contribution to the EU budget: € 0.154 billion

Total EU spending in Estonia: € 0.648 billion

Finland is a parliamentary republic with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the president. The central government is based in Helsinki and the local governments in the 311 municipalities (towns and cities). The country is divided into 19 regions and 70 sub-regions. The smallest region, Åland, is an autonomous archipelago in the south-west. The northern Lappi region comprises the Sami Domicile Area, home to around half of Finland’s indigenous Sami people (also known as Lapps or Laplanders).

Estonia

Total Finnish contribution to the EU budget: € 1.595 billion

Total EU spending in Finland: € 1.501 billion

France is a semi-presidential republic with a head of government — the prime minister — appointed by the president who is the directly elected head of state. France’s territory consists of 18 administrative regions — 13 metropolitan (i.e. European France) and 5 overseas regions. All 5 of the overseas regions, as well as Saint-Martin (a French territory in the Caribbean), are considered part of the EU (with the status of an outermost region). Strasbourg, a city in France, is one of the three official seats of the European institutions. The others are Brussels and Luxembourg City.

France

Total French contribution to the EU budget: € 16.234 billion

Total EU spending in France: € 13.505 billion

Germany is a federal parliamentary republic with a head of government — the chancellor — and a head of state — the president — whose primary responsibilities are representative. The country comprises 16 states which each have their own constitution and are largely autonomous regarding their internal organization. 3 of these are city-states: Bremen, Berlin, and Hamburg.

Germany

Total German contribution to the EU budget: € 19.587 billion

Total EU spending in Germany: € 10.927 billion

Greece is a parliamentary republic with a head of government — the prime minister — who has the most political power, and the head of state — the president — whose duties are largely ceremonial. The executive power is exercised by the government.

Total Greek contribution to the EU budget: € 1.248 billion

Total EU spending in Greece: € 5.130 billion

Hungary is a parliamentary republic with a head of government — the prime minister — who exercises executive power and a head of state — the president — whose primary responsibilities are representative. Hungary is divided into 19 counties, Budapest, and 23 cities with county-level authority.

Hungary

Total EU spending as % of Hungarian gross national income (GNI): 3.43 %

Total Hungarian contribution to the EU budget: € 0.821 billion

Ireland is a parliamentary republic consisting of 26 counties. The head of government — the prime minister — is appointed by the president after nomination by the Lower House (Dail) and exercises executive power. The head of state — the president — mostly has ceremonial powers. The Parliament has 2 chambers (an Upper and Lower House).

Ireland

Total Irish contribution to the EU budget: € 1.777 billion

Total EU spending in Ireland: € 1.818 billion

Italy is a parliamentary republic with a head of government — the prime minister — appointed by the president and a head of state — the president. The Parliament is composed of 2 houses: the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate of the Republic. The country is subdivided into 20 regions. 5 of these have a special autonomous status, enabling them to pass legislation on some local matters.

Italy

Total Italian contribution to the EU budget: € 12 billion

Total EU spending in Italy: € 9.795 billion

Latvia is a parliamentary republic with a head of government — the prime minister — who chooses the council of ministers and a head of state — the president — who has a largely ceremonial role and nominates the prime minister. The government remains subject to Parliament’s approval throughout each term. The country is subdivided into 110 one-level municipalities and 9 cities. These have their own city councils and municipal administrations.

Latvia

Total Latvian contribution to the EU budget: € 0.184 billion

Total EU spending in Latvia: € 0.737 billion

Lithuania is a parliamentary republic with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the president — who appoints the prime minister. The Parliament is a single-chamber legislative body. The country is divided into 60 municipalities, with directly-elected mayors.

Lithuania

Total Lithuanian contribution to the EU budget: € 0.274 billion

Total EU spending in Lithuania: € 1.575 billion

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is a parliamentary constitutional monarchy (Grand Duchy) with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the Grand Duke — who has only formal rights. The government exercises executive power. General elections take place every 5 years. 60 members are elected to a single-chamber legislative body, the Chamber of Deputies. The country is divided into 4 electoral regions, 12 administrative cantons and 105 communes. 12 of the communes have city status, the largest being Luxembourg City. Luxembourg City, together with Brussels and Strasbourg, is one of the three official seats of the European institutions. Luxembourg has three official languages: French, German and Luxemburgish.

Luxembourg

Total Luxembourg contribution to the EU budget: € 0.307 billion

Total EU spending in Luxembourg: € 1.827 billion

Malta is a single-chamber parliamentary republic with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the president — whose role is largely ceremonial. The country is divided into 5 regions. Each has its own regional committee, which serves as the intermediary between local and national government.

Malta

Total Maltese contribution to the EU budget: € 0.082 billion

Total EU spending in Malta: € 0.201 billion

The Netherlands is a parliamentary constitutional monarchy with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the monarch. A council of ministers holds executive power. The country is divided into 12 provinces and 388 municipalities. It is also divided into 22 water districts, governed by an executive board that has authority in matters of water management. The Netherlands also includes 6 overseas countries and territories in the Caribbean. These territories are not part of the EU.

Netherlands

Total Dutch contribution to the EU budget: € 4.384 billion

Total EU spending in the Netherlands: € 2.417 billion

Poland is a parliamentary republic with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the president. The government structure is centered on the council of ministers. The country is divided into 16 provinces, largely based on the country’s historic regions. Administrative authority at the provincial level is shared between a government-appointed governor, an elected regional assembly and an executive elected by the regional assembly.

Poland
  • Total Polish contribution to the EU budget: € 3.048 billion
  • Total EU spending in Poland: € 11.921 billion

Romania is a semi-presidential republic with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the president. Executive functions are held by both the government and the president. The country is divided into 41 counties and the municipality of Bucharest. Each county is administered by a county council, responsible for local affairs, and a perfect responsible for administering national affairs at the county level.

Romania

Total Romanian contribution to the EU budget: € 1.229 billion

Total EU spending in Romania: € 4.742 billion

Portugal is a semi-presidential republic with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the president — who has the power to appoint the prime minister and other government members. The country is administratively divided into 308 municipalities, subdivided into 3,092 civil parishes. Operationally, the only legally identifiable local administrative units are the municipality and civil parish, and the national government.

Portugal

Total EU spending in Portugal: € 3.976 billion

Total EU spending in Portugal: € 3.976 billion

Slovakia is a parliamentary democratic republic with a head of government — the prime minister — who holds the most executive power and a head of state the president — who is the formal head of the executive, but with very limited powers. The country is subdivided into 8 regions, each named after its principal city. These have been given a certain degree of autonomy since 2002.

Slovakia

Total Slovakian contribution to the EU budget: € 0.600 billion

Total EU spending in Slovakia: € 1.645 billion

Spain is a parliamentary democracy and constitutional monarchy with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the monarch. A council of ministers is the executive branch and is presided over by the prime minister. Spain is a unitary state, composed of 17 autonomous communities and 2 autonomous cities with varying degrees of autonomy.

Spain

Total Spanish contribution to the EU budget: € 8.080 billion

Total EU spending in Spain: € 9.6643 billion

Sweden is a constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the monarch. The government exercises executive power. Legislative power is vested in the single-chamber parliament. Sweden is a unitary state, divided into 20 counties and 290 municipalities.

  • Total Swedish contribution to the EU budget: € 2.629 billion
  • Total EU spending in Sweden: € 1.504 billion

On 23 June 2016 citizens of the United Kingdom (UK) voted to leave the European Union (EU). On 29 March 2017, the UK formally notified the European Council of its intention to leave the EU by triggering of Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty.

For the time being, the United Kingdom remains a full member of the EU and rights and obligations continue to fully apply in and to the UK.

The United Kingdom (UK) is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary democracy with a head of government — the prime minister — and a head of state — the monarch. The UK consists of 4 countries: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The last 3 have devolved administrations with varying powers. The UK also has varying degrees of links with 3 crown dependencies — the Isle of Man, Guernsey, and Jersey. These are not part of the UK, but the British government is responsible for their defense and international representation. The country has also 14 overseas territories which are not formally part of the UK or (except Gibraltar) the EU.

Total UK contribution to the EU budget: € 10.575 billion

Total EU spending in the UK: € 6.326 billion.

Regarding the UK.

Before 2016 the UK along with both Germany and France paid far more into the EU.

UK’s contribution was €17 billion with a Total EU spending in the UK of € 7 billion.

When the UK decided to leave the EU the EU gave out a statement regarding the UK leaving.

European Commission — Statement

Joint Statement by Martin Schulz, President of the European Parliament, Donald Tusk, President of the European Council, Mark Rutte, Holder of the Presidency of the Council of the EU, Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission

Brussels, 24 June 2016

President Schulz, President Tusk and Prime Minister Rutte met this morning in Brussels upon the invitation of European Commission President Juncker. They discussed the outcome of the United Kingdom referendum and made the following joint statement:

“In a free and democratic process, the British people have expressed their wish to leave the European Union. We regret this decision but respect it.

This is an unprecedented situation but we are united in our response. We will stand strong and uphold the EU’s core values of promoting peace and the well-being of its peoples. The Union of 27 Member States will continue. The Union is the framework of our common political future. We are bound together by history, geography and common interests and will develop our cooperation on this basis. Together we will address our common challenges to generate growth, increase prosperity and ensure a safe and secure environment for our citizens. The institutions will play their full role in this endeavor.

We now expect the United Kingdom government to give effect to this decision of the British people as soon as possible, however painful that process may be. Any delay would unnecessarily prolong uncertainty. We have rules to deal with this in an orderly way. Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union sets out the procedure to be followed if a Member State decides to leave the European Union. We stand ready to launch negotiations swiftly with the United Kingdom regarding the terms and conditions of its withdrawal from the European Union. Until this process of negotiations is over, the United Kingdom remains a member of the European Union, with all the rights and obligations that derive from this. According to the Treaties which the United Kingdom has ratified, EU law continues to apply to the full to and in the United Kingdom until it is no longer a Member.

As agreed, the “New Settlement for the United Kingdom within the European Union”, reached at the European Council on 18–19 February 2016, will now not take effect and ceases to exist. There will be no renegotiation.

As regards the United Kingdom, we hope to have it as a close partner of the European Union in the future. We expect the United Kingdom to formulate its proposals in this respect. Any agreement, which will be concluded with the United Kingdom as a third country, will have to reflect the interests of both sides and be balanced in terms of rights and obligations.”

You may have noticed one country France that has overseas territory’s that are in the EU.

France has 5 overseas regions. All 5 of the overseas regions, as well as Saint-Martin (a French territory in the Caribbean), are considered part of the EU.

They are as follows

Guadeloupe (Caribbean)

Martinique (Caribbean)

French Guyana (South America)

Mayotte (Indian Ocean)

Réunion (Indian Ocean)

This shows that the reach of the EU is all over the world, not just in Europe

What is life without a little controversy in it? Quite boring and sterile would be my answer.